Monday, June 24, 2019

CHANGING CHILD CUSTODY. Attorney Terry Bankert (810) 235-1970

#FLINT#GENESEE#Michigan ISSUE- CHANGING CUSTODY
"Where a current order governs the custody of a minor child, the party moving to modify that order must prove “either proper cause or a change of circumstances sufficient to warrant
reconsideration of the custody decision.” Gerstenschalger v Gerstenschalger, 292 Mich App.654, 657; 808 NW2d 811 (2011)."
Presented here by Terry Bankert Flint Family Law Lawyer, (810 235-1970 www.attorneybankert.com
"[T]o establish “proper cause” necessary to revisit a custody order, a movant must prove by a preponderance of the evidence the existence of an appropriate ground for legal action to be taken by the trial court. The appropriate ground(s) should be
relevant to at least one of the twelve statutory best interest factors, and must be of such magnitude to have a significant effect on the child’s well-being. . . . "
" * * *[T]o establish a “change of circumstances,” a movant must prove that, since the entry of the last custody order, the conditions surrounding custody of the child,
which have or could have a significant effect on the child’s well-being, have materially changed. . . ."
" [T]he evidence must demonstrate something more than
the normal life changes (both good and bad) that occur during the life of a child, and there must be at least some evidence that the material changes have had or will almost certainly have an effect on the child. This too will be a determination
made on the basis of the facts of each case, with the relevance of the facts presented being gauged by the statutory best interest factors. [Vodvarka v
Grasmeyer, 259 Mich App 499, 512-514; 675 NW2d 847 (2003)."
"If the movant establishes proper cause or a change in circumstances, the court may modify an established custody order if the court determines that the modification is in the child’s
best interests. MCL 722.27(c); Dailey v Kloenhamer, 291 Mich App 660, 665; 811 NW2d 501
(2011)."
“When a modification would change the established custodial environment of a child, the moving party must show by clear and convincing evidence that it is in the child’s best
interest.” Shade v Wright, 291 Mich App 17, 23; 805 NW2d 1 (2010)."
“If the proposed change does not change the established custodial environment, however, the burden is on the parent
proposing the change to establish, by a preponderance of the evidence, that the change is in the child’s best interests.” Id."
" If the movant does not establish proper cause or a change in
circumstances, the trial court may not revisit the current custody order. Dailey, 291 Mich App at
666-667."
(Source; Unpublished Michigan Court Of Appeals 6/11/19, No 346335)

Sphere: Related Content

Wednesday, June 12, 2019

CHANGING CUSTODIAL ENVIRONMENT.

MAY A COURT AMEND A CUSTODY OR PARENTING TIME ORDER?
A trial court may modify or amend its previous judgments or orders, including those addressing custody or parenting-time issues, “for proper cause shown or because of a change of circumstances.” MCL 722.27(1)(c). Before doing so, a trial court “must first consider whether the proposed change would modify the established custodial environment.” Pierron v Pierron, 486 Mich 81, 85; 782 NW2d 480 (2010). “
WHAT IS THE ESTABLISHED CUSTODIAL ENVIRONMENT.
“The established custodial environment is the environment in which over an appreciable time the child naturally looks to the custodian in that environment for guidance, discipline, the necessities of life, and parental comfort.” Id. (quotation marks omitted), citing MCL 722.27(1)(c). “
EXAMPLE OF WHEN THIS ENVIRONMENT NOT CHANGED.
“Whereas minor modifications that leave a party’s parenting time essentially intact do not change a child’s established custodial environment, significant changes do.” Lieberman, 319 Mich App at 89-90 (cleaned up). If parenting-time adjustments “will not change whom the child naturally looks to for guidance, discipline, the necessities of life, and parental comfort, then the established custodial environment will not have changed.” Pierron, 486 Mich at 86. “
EVIDENCE NEED TO CHANGE CUSTODIAL ENVIRONMENT
“The trial court “shall not modify or amend its previous judgments or orders or issue a new order so as to change the established custodial environment of a child unless there is presented clear and convincing evidence that it is in the best interest of the child.” MCL 722.27(1)(c). “
“It is presumed to be in the best interests of a child for the child to have a strong relationship with both of his or her parents.” MCL 722.27a(1).”
“Whereas the primary concern in child custody determinations is the stability of the child’s environment and avoidance of unwarranted and disruptive custody changes, the focus of parenting time is to foster a strong relationship between the child and the child’s parents.” Shade v Wright, 291 Mich App 17, 28-29; 805 NW2d 1 (2010).” (Source, e-journal #70586, Michigan Court of Appeals unpublished 5/21/19, no.346025.)
Presented here by Flint Divorce Lawyer Terry Bankert Attorney practicing Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Parenting time, Support and other Family issues. 1-(810- 235-1970, www.attorneybankert.com No charge for initial appointment.

Sphere: Related Content

Friday, June 7, 2019

Mentally Ill Parent and Child Custody. Terry Bankert (810) 235-1970

Will mental illness cause a loss of custody?
"... while mental illnesses may create unfortunate barriers for parents in child custody cases, it is the best interests of the child that must guide a trial court in making custody and parenting time decisions."


"Unlike cases involving the termination of parental rights, in which courts must balance the best interests of minors against the constitutional rights of their parents, a trial court’s singular focus in cases brought under the Child Custody Act, MCL 722.21 et seq., is “ ‘to promote the best interests of the child and to provide a stable environment for children that is free of unwarranted custody changes.’ ” Lieberman v Orr, 319 Mich App 68, 78; 900 NW2d 130 (2017), quoting Pierron v Pierron, 282 Mich App 222, 243; 765 NW2d 345 (2009). With respect to parenting time decisions in particular, MCL 722.27a(1) provides, in pertinent part: (1) Parenting time shall be granted in accordance with the best interests of the child. It is presumed to be in the best interests of a child for the child to have a strong relationship with both of his or her parents. Except as otherwise provided in this section, parenting time shall be granted to a parent in frequency, duration, and type reasonably calculated to promote a strong relationship between the child and the parent granted parenting time. -5- However, if “it is shown on the record by clear and convincing evidence that it would endanger the child’s physical, mental, or emotional health,” parenting time need not be ordered. MCL 722.27a(3); Luna v Regnier, 326 Mich App 173, ___; ___ NW2d ___ (2018) (Docket No. 343382); slip op at 3. "
(e-journal 70441, Jackson v Appling Mich. App. Unpublished 5/7/19.No. 345488.

Presented here by Flint Family Law ,Divorce, Attorney Terry Bankert. www.attorneybankert.com .
Call Lawyer Terry Bankert  (810) 235-1970

Sphere: Related Content