Monday, July 12, 2010

Auto City Speedway, Stock Car Racing, DumpMySpouse.com

Flint Divorce Attorney Terry Bankert is the Genesee County Dumpmyspouse.com franchisee.(DMS).

They are one of the sponsors of AUTO CITY SPEEDWAY and several Auto City Speedway Stock Car competitors Gerald Persails Car #80 and Mike Wine Car #24.

Auto City Speedway has shown us the family nature of Michigan Short track Stock car racing and the intense competitive nature of this great American tradition.

Flint divorce attorney Terry Bankert is the author of Dumpmyspouse.com, Stock Car Racing. SEE
http://dumpmyspousestockcar.blogspot.com/2010/07/short-track-racing-auto-city-speedway.html

This blog is intended to share this experience. As divorce practitioners of course our benefit is to promote our service. We do not cause divorce, we just help when it happens to you. If you need help ,divorce, child support, child custody, contact Flint Family Law lawyer Terry Bankert at Http://attorneybankert.com

First in this post you will find background material on Short track Racing.

Stock car racing is a form of automobile racing found mainly in the United States, Canada, New Zealand, Great Britain and Brazil. Traditionally, races are run on oval tracks measuring approximately ¼ mile to 2.66 miles (about 400 meters to 4.2 kilometres) in length. NASCAR (National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing) is the world's largest governing body for stock car racing, and its Sprint Cup Series (named for its sponsor, Sprint Nextel Corporation) is the de facto premier series of stock car racing.

Top level races are 200 to 600 miles (320–1000 km) in length. Average speeds in the top classes are usually within 70–80% of comparable levels of open wheel racing at the same tracks. Some stock cars may reach speeds in excess of 200 mph (320 km/h) at tracks such as Indianapolis Motor Speedway and Charlotte Motor Speedway. For safety, devices such as restrictor plates may be used at Daytona International Speedway and Talladega Superspeedway that limit top speeds to approximately 192 mph (309 km/h).

Stock cars

A stock car, in the original sense of the term, described an automobile that has not been modified from its original factory configuration. Later the term stock car came to mean any production-based automobile used in racing. This term is used to differentiate such a car from a race car, a special, custom-built car designed only for racing purposes.

Today most stock cars may superficially resemble standard American family sedans, but are in fact purpose-built racing machines built to a strict set of regulations governing the car design ensuring that the chassis, suspension, engine, etc. are architecturally identical on all vehicles. Ironically, these regulations ensure that stock cars are in many ways technologically less sophisticated than standard cars on the road. For example, NASCAR (the largest stock car organization in the U.S.) requires carbureted engines in all of its racing series, while fuel injection is now universal in standard passenger cars.

The closest European equivalent to stock car racing is probably touring car racing, though these are raced exclusively on road courses rather than ovals.

Classes

There are several classes of stock car racing, each with slightly different rules, but the key intention of cars that look like production cars, but with near-identical specifications underneath, remains true.

Street Stock

'True' stock car racing, which consists of only street vehicles that can be bought by general public, is sometimes now called Street Stock, Pure Stock, Showroom Stock, or U-Car racing. In 1972, SCCA started its first showroom stock racing series, with a price ceiling on the cars of $3,000. Some modern showroom stock racing allows safety modifications done on showroom stock cars.

Super Stock

Super Stock classes are similar to street stock, but allow for more modifications to the engine. Power output is usually in the range of 500–550 horsepower (373–410 kilowatts). Tire width is usually limited to 8 in (200 mm).[1]


Late Model

Late Models are usually the highest class of stock cars in local racing.[1] There may be subcategories of Late Models such as Super Late Models and Limited Late Models. A Late Model may be a custom built machine, or a heavily modified street car. The national touring series, the NASCAR Late Model Sportsman Division, originated from local late model races in the East Coast of the United States This division became the Busch Series and then the Nationwide Series.[2]

Stock car series

The most prominent championship in stock car racing is the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series, named after its sponsor Sprint Nextel. It is the most popular racing series in the United States, drawing over 6 million spectators in 1997, an average live audience of over 190,000 people for each race.
The most famous event in the series is the Daytona 500[5], an annual 500-mile race at Daytona Beach, Florida. The series' second-biggest event is arguably The Brickyard 400, an annual 400-mile race held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, the legendary home of the Indianapolis 500, an open-wheeled race. NASCAR also operates the Nationwide Series, a stock car junior league, and the Camping World Truck Series, a junior league where pickup trucks are raced. Together the two car-based series (Sprint Cup and Nationwide Series) drew 8 million spectators in 1997, compared to 4 million for both American open-wheel series (CART and IRL), which merged in 2008 under the IRL banner. In 2002, 17 of the 20 US top sporting events in terms of attendance were stock car races. Only football drew more television viewers that year.

Besides NASCAR, there are a number of other national or regional stock-car sanctioning bodies in the United States. There are a few organizations that cater to these local short tracks. The Automobile Racing Club of America (ARCA), American Speed Association (ASA), Champion Racing Association (CRA), International Motor Contest Association (IMCA), United Auto Racing Association UARA and, United Speed Alliance Racing (USAR) all sanction their own forms of stock-car racing, on varying types of track, and with various levels of media coverage. The International Race of Champions (IROC) series used stock cars, but is usually perceived as being outside of the usual stock car racing scene because of its 'All-Star' design. [1]

In North American auto racing, particularly with regard to NASCAR, a short track is a racetrack of less than one mile (1.6 km) in length. Short track racing, often associated with fairgrounds and similar venues, is where stock car racing first got off of the back roads and into organized and regulated competition. Many traditional fans and purists still see short track racing as the "real" NASCAR, because the lower speeds make "paint swapping," where the bodies of the cars actually rub against one another, practical without a very high likelihood of serious accidents. In fact, NASCAR sanctions such "club" racing, offering the Whelen All-American Series as a national championship for the drivers, and an invitational race for club racers, the Toyota All-Star Showdown, a 150-lap race featuring the common Super Late Models with NASCAR-established rules. In 2007, NASCAR is increasing marketing of the short tracks with the "NASCAR Home Tracks" campaign, with Greg Biffle, Elliott Sadler, and Carl Edwards featured in advertising to market short track racing. In some cases a Sprint Cup star or two will race in a weekly short-track event held usually on a short track near that week's race, or in a midweek special, such as the Slinger Nationals at Wisconsin's Slinger Super Speedway, a quarter-mile track (but is not NASCAR-sanctioned).

Ken Schrader, Tony Stewart, Dave Blaney, Scott Wimmer, and Dale Earnhardt, Jr. all own short tracks, most of them being dirt. Stewart owns the Eldora Speedway, which features Sprint Cup stars and other nationally recognised drivers in the "Prelude to the Dream" dirt late model race. Dale Earnhardt, Jr. is a partner in the Paducah (Kentucky) International Speedway.

In recent years, there has been a gradual push away from short track venues for Sprint Cup (the highest level of NASCAR) in favor of longer tracks. This is due to larger venues having accommodations for more fans (although the short track in Bristol, Tennessee, Bristol Motor Speedway, now has over 160,000 seats) and higher speeds.[2]

Posted here by
Terry Bankert
Http://attorneybankert.com


[1]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stock_car_racing
[2]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Short_track_motor_racing

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2 comments:

吳婷婷 said...

人生的苦惱,不在擁有太少,而在奢望太多。..................................................

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